Ho‘opili

Ewa Beach, Hawai‘i

Weʻre proud to have finished a Mele Mural project with Makakilo Elementary School and our first mural in the new area of Ho‘opili. The title of this Mele Mural is “Alahula o Pu’uloa, He Alahele Na Ka’ahupāhau / Everywhere in Puʻuloa is the trail of Kaʻahupāhau.”

The title is in reference to the great shark goddess, Kaʻahupāhau, and how she protected the people of ʻEwa from man-eating sharks. The “trail” she leaves in her wake, shown in the mural, mirrors the ānuenue (rainbows) that appeared overhead on every day that we worked on the mural. With the presence of each ānuenue, Kaʻahupāhauʻs presence was felt.

Ka‘ōnohiokalā (the eye of the sun) – The sun is a source of strength and energy that was birthed into existence by nā akua (the gods), and it is the residence of the sun god Kaʻōnohiokalā. All living things look to nā akua, ka ʻāina (the land), and ka wai (the fresh water streams & ocean) for their needs to be satisfied. The image of the sun represents how much we are loved and that the akua’s providential care of all people is signified by this eye watching over us daily. Additionally, the raindrops falling from the heavens are an incredible display of nā akua’s blessings that have never failed to pour down on all living creatures providing everything we need to sustain life whether it be food, water, protection, knowledge and so much more.

Ka’ahupahau – The guardian sharks of Pu’uloa were Ka’ahupāhau and her brother Kahi’uka. Such guardian sharks, which inhabited the coastlines of all the islands, were benevolent gods who were cared for and worshiped by the people and who aided fishermen, protected the life of the seas, and drove off man-eating sharks. Ka’ahupahau may mean “Well-cared for Feather Cloak” (the feather cloak was a symbol of royalty). Kahi’ukā means “Smiting Tail.” His shark tail was used to strike at enemy sharks and he also used his tail to strike fishermen as a warning that unfriendly sharks had entered Pu’uloa. Ka’ahupāhau lived in an underwater cave in Honouliuli lagoon (West Loch). Kahi’ukā lived in an underwater cave off Moku’ume’ume (Ford Island) near Keanapua’a Point at the entrance of East Loch. He also had the form of an underwater stone. Ka’ahupāhau no longer lives at Pu’uloa, coming and going with her twin sons Kupipi and Kumaninini. But when the United States government built a dry-dock for the navy just over the old home of Ka’ahupāhau, the natives regarded the proceedings with superstitious fear. Scarcely was it completed after years of labor when the structure fell with a crash. Today a floating dock is employed. Engineers say that there seem to be tremors of the earth at this point which prevent any structure from resting upon the bottom, but Hawaiians believe that “The-smiting-tail” still guards the blue lagoon at Pearl Harbor. Source 

Mary Kawena Pukui gives an interpretation of the saying in ‘Ōlelo No’eau: Hawaiian Proverbs and Poetical Sayings, No. 105: “Alahula o Pu’uloa, he alahele na Ka’ahupāhau.” Said of a person who goes everywhere, looking, peering, seeing all, or of a person familiar with every nook and corner of a place.” Ka’ahupāhau was noted for traveling about, vigilantly guarding her domain against man-eating invaders.

Kaʻahupāhau would travel around constantly, watching out for other sharks and providing safety and protection for the kamaʻāina of Puʻuloa. Thus, this ʻōlelo noʻeau (Hawaiian proverbs) can be used in reference to those who exhibit those same characteristics; watchful, protective, looking out for others and their surroundings. This is something we should all remember it is our kuleana (responsibility) to do. This poetic reference is also used to describe someone familiar with a place and who knows every feature of an area. It reminds us how important it is to reestablish the practice of knowing our ʻāina (land) and moʻolelo (stories), and teaching our keiki (children) to take on leadership roles in perpetuating these values as we progress into the future.

A special mahalo goes out to Principal Todd Fujimori and Sherry Yoshida of Makakilo Elementary School, Lee from D.R. Horton, our sponsors of Montana Cans, and guest artists, Eugene “Eukarezt” Kristoff, and Jack Soren.

Mele for this mural: Pupu a o ‘Ewa

Hui:

Püpü (a`o `Ewa) i ka nu`a (nä känaka)

E naue mai (a e `ike)

I ka mea hou (o ka `äina)

Ahe `äina (ua kaulana)

Mai nä küpuna mai

Alahula Pu`uloa he ala hele no

Ka`ahupahau, (Ka`ahupähau)

Alahula Pu`uloa he ala hele no

Ka`ahupähau, Ka`ahupähau

 

Nani Ka`ala hemolele i ka mälie

Kuahiwi kaulana a`o `Ewa

E ki`i ana i ka makani o ka `äina

Hea ka Moa`e eia au e ke aloha

91 960 Iwikuamoo St, Ewa Beach, HI 96706, USA

Mural Name

Alahula o Pu’uloa, He Alahele Na Ka’ahupāhau  Everywhere in Puʻuloa is the trail of Kaʻahupāhau

Date Completed

October 20th, 2017

Schools Served

Makakilo Elementary School

Lead Artists

Estria Miyashiro, Eugene “Eukarezt” Kristoff, Nicole Makaahinaalohilohi Jack, Luke Pomai DeKneef

Cultural Practitioners, Kūpuna, Community Orgs

Sponsors & Supporters

D.R. Horton, Montana Cans, Glidden Paint

We Need Your Help

Your tax deductible Annual Membership provides much needed support for arts education in Hawaiʻi.

Help purchasing much needed supplies for our wall murals.

Assist in funding cultural advisers for our youth workshops.

Help stage events surrounding our public mural unveilings.

We Need Your Help

Your tax deductible Annual Membership provides much needed support for arts education in Hawaiʻi.

Help purchasing much needed supplies for our wall murals.

Assist in funding cultural advisers for our youth workshops.

Help stage events surrounding our public mural unveilings.

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